Old Dog, Newest Trick

The more I think about it, the more in love with the assignment given by agent Brooks Sherman (@byobrooks) of FinePrint Literary Management in his query contest. The assignment in order to enter was this:

“Write a 100 word short story from the POV of your antagonist/villain.  It can be his/her/its perspective on an event that actually occurs in your story, but that’s not required.  Before, after, or an unseen event are fine, too.”

At first I was daunted by the 100 word limit. Whoa, that’s barely a paragraph. I outlined out a whole scene to show my villain in his full glory, then realized my outline with 67 words. So, time to put my short story writing to the test and condense everything into 100 words and still show my villain. Also, I wanted to get his GMC (Goal Motivation and Conflict) to come out in the short segment as well. After some hard work and repeated and repeated revision I came up with this entry.

“Never partner with an idiot, no matter how good a patsy they’d make. He had to deal with that psycho who was smuggling his brothers and sisters into this putrid hole, nothing like the home in the stars they deserved. The deep stations were theirs; the cattle just didn’t know it yet. Staring at their “meals” hung on the girders, he sneered at the smell of human blood. Once it had been his whole existence. Now he ate higher on the chain. Reassured for another shift, he put on his security uniform and Bio-Com to climb into the station proper. “

The best part about this is that I think he ended up sounding like a hero in his own head. Isn’t that the truth with many complex villains? I wish that I had done this first. This really let me get even deeper inside of him and know him more, as icky as that concept may be. It’s coming across like the elevator pitch for the individual character. It limits the wordiness that can be a battle. I had to stream-line and be extremely specific. And it was a blast to have the finished project.

Goal, Motivation and Conflict is so important to have three dimensional characters, and on common character sheets they are there for the protagonist. They are needed for all the main characters. Even if there is a main POV that the story is from, each character is experiencing their own story at the same time. In order for them to act as they should and not simply be a plot device, GMC is vital to guide their actions.

Let's look under the hood. What's seems to be your issues?

On top of that, this small exercise let me listen in on the character’s voice, even if it was only in his head. This would have made dialogue and actions so much easier to write if I’d had it from the beginning.

So, thank you, Brooks Sherman (@byobrooks) of FinePrint Literary Management and Emma Trevayne of Nailing Shadows to the Wall for hosting this contest. Through your great ideas, a new slot on my character sheets have been filled, and I look forward to the birth of deeper and more realistic characters.

Photo Credit: “Mechanics of People Mind”

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About Courtney Sloan

A New Orleans native, Courtney Sloan relocated to the hills of Central Maryland after Hurricane Katrina. There she lives with her husband and fellow author, J.P. Sloan, their son and their crazy German Shepherd pup. Adding to her writing life, Courtney is also a professor at the local college and enjoys learning a world of new ideas from her students as she teaches them about writing and communicating. Courtney’s New Orleans upbringing has left her with a love for the macabre and a flare for the next to normal. She writes speculative fiction with a variety of horror and sass mixed in for flavor. She loves taking the world of politics that haunts us now, and adding the supernatural to create a gumbo of thrills to keep you up at night. A self-proclaimed lover of way too many fandoms, Courtney also loves crafting. From blankets to jams to stories, it’s always better homemade. View all posts by Courtney Sloan

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